Council Research Statements

 

Information in “Ask the doctor: Are artificial sweeteners a good alternative to sugar?” which appeared in the December 2011 edition of the Harvard Health Letter makes claims that are not substantiated by scientific research.
Science and nutrition experts are highly critical of new research claiming diet soft drink consumption is linked to an increased risk of stroke.
A new comprehensive review concludes that fructose does not increase food intake or impact body weight or blood triglycerides in overweight or obese individuals.
ATLANTA (May 5, 2010) – The European Food Safety Authority’s (EFSA) Scientific Panel on additives has established an Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) for the low-calorie sweetener stevia, clearing the way for broader approvals of the popular ingredient as a sweetener in the European Union. The...
A study published in the August 2010 journal, Appetite, further demonstrates that people who consume low-calorie sweeteners are able to significantly reduce their caloric intake and do not overeat. In fact, study participants who received the sugar substitutes instead of sugar consumed...
A new study reports that consumption of sugar-free beverages sweetened with low-calorie sweeteners is beneficial for long-term weight control...
Recent Study Supports Extensive Prior Research that Documents No Association Between Low-Calorie Sweeteners and Cancer
New research indicates that fructose may be a beneficial part of the diet, contrary to recent reports. Fructose occurs naturally in fruits and vegetables as well as honey. Often confused with high fructose corn syrup (which contains nearly equal amounts of glucose and fructose and is handled by...
The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has once again confirmed the safety of aspartame. After a comprehensive review of data, EFSA’s Scientific Panel on Food Additives, Flavourings, Processing Aids and Materials in Contact with Food (AFC) stated, "Overall, the Panel concluded on the basis...
The Calorie Control Council is concerned about findings published in the January 2009 issue of Diabetes Care. The study findings do not reflect the scientific literature confirming the safety and benefits of low-calorie sweeteners and the products that contain them. The following outlines...
A recent review of the scientific literature has concluded that low-calorie (or no-calorie) sweeteners can be helpful in resolving the obesity problem. Although they are not magic bullets, low-calorie sweeteners in beverages and foods can help people reduce their calorie (energy) intakes. “Low-...