Sugary Foods Linked to Heart Attack Risk

According to a recent study, women who consume large amounts of certain high-carbohydrate foods increase their risk of heart disease. The study - which was published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, an American Medical Association publication - showed an increased incidence of coronary disease in women whose diet is rich in foods with a 'high glycemic index', such as white bread, sweets and some sugary breakfast cereals. Those results, however, were not seen in men. The study noted that all high-carbohydrate diets increase the levels of blood glucose and harmful blood fats known as triglycerides while reducing levels of protective HDL or "good" cholesterol, thereby increasing heart disease risk. But the researchers found not all carbohydrates have the same effect on blood glucose levels. They concluded that blood glucose and triglycerides were impacted more by foods with a high glycemic index, compared with other carbohydrates with a lower index, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Approximately 47,749 adults were studied, including 15,171 men and 32,578 women. The women who consumed the most carbohydrates overall had roughly twice the risk of heart disease as those who consumed the least.