Feature Articles

2014 Articles

A new study which claims that fructose may play a unique role in the development of obesity and diabetes is limited by several study flaws, including contradicting research, exaggerated consumption levels, small sample size and reliance on animal research. In the 21-person study “Fructose...
The safety and benefits of low-calorie sweeteners, such as aspartame, saccharin and sucralose, have long been verified by regulatory agencies and health organizations around the world, including the American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association. However, a recent segment featured...
A new study of more than 1,600 people has concluded that fructose is not associated with the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).* Participants in this study were from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study (HBCS) which included 8,760 people born in one hospital between 1934 and 1944...
September 22, 2014 -- The study published in Nature this week on artificial sweeteners goes against what we know as clinicians and what our patients tell us. The study tries to link low calorie sweeteners with weight gain and ignores the extensive data that demonstrates that low calorie sweeteners...
ATLANTA, Sept. 17, 2014 -- According to the Calorie Control Council*, study findings published today in a Nature** article ("Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota") are at odds with leading health organizations and many other peer-reviewed...
Summary: The study suffers from small sample sizes, unrealistic sweetener applications, and a dependence largely on rodent research. Findings should be interpreted with caution. Statements from leading health organizations and other peer-reviewed published studies are contrary to the study...
Moderate consumption of fructose does not lead to adverse metabolic health in adolescents, according to a new study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. In the study, 40 participants took part in two 15-day trials: one for high-fructose sweetened beverages (HF) and one for high...
Available scientific evidence does not support a link between fructose consumption and risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NALFD), according to a recent review published in The American Journal of Clinical Health. In the review, researchers considered evidence from 27 observation and...
According to a recent study, a high consumption level of fructose does not lead to high cholesterol or high blood pressure. In the study, the researchers considered three different intake levels of added sugar, including fructose: 8% of calories (which is the upper level recommendation from...
Researchers find possible mechanism to explain why fiber is associated with reduced appetite, according to a new study by Frost et al. published in Nature Communications. In the study, the researchers supplemented high-fat diets of mice with a highly digestible fiber, inulin, or a poorly digested...
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