Health Professional Library

FREE CPEs Available
The Calorie Control Council is now a Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) accredited continuing professional education (CPE) provider. Dietitians and Dietetic Technicians can now receive CPEs by viewing the recorded webinars and self-studies available on caloriecontrol.org. Health professionals can review and learn more about low-calorie sweeteners, the food additive approval process (...
Benefits
The Role of Low-Calorie Sweeteners in Weight ControlLow-calorie sweeteners provide consumers with...
Research finds that using low calorie sweeteners does not cause people to crave sweetness
Research shows the sweetness of low calorie sweeteners does not affect the body.
In a review article, “The Use of Low Calorie Sweeteners by Adults: Impact on Weight Management,” published in the May Edition of the Journal of Nutrition, Anderson et al discuss the relationship...
An updated Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics position paper confirms the safety and benefits of low-calorie sweeteners.
The need for public and health professional education about dietary fiber is crucial since consumption of fiber is low enough to be of public health concern for both adults and children, according to...
According to a review published in Advances in Dental Research, one of the best ways to protect your smile may be to consume more xylitol. Xylitol is a sugar substitute that has also been shown to...
The glycemic index (GI) concept was developed in 1981 as a way to rank carbohydrate-containing foods based on their potential to raise blood glucose.(1) GI measures the extent to which a specific...
Polyols, also called sugar alcohols, are a group of versatile, reduced-calorie carbohydrates that provide the taste and texture of sugar with about half the calories. They are used as food...
Stevia rebaudiana is a South American plant native to Paraguay that has long been used to sweeten beverages and make tea. While the word “stevia” refers to the entire plant only some of the...
Polyols are sugar-free, low-digestible carbohydrate sweeteners, also known as sugar replacers. This PowerPoint presentation is designed for health professionals who are educating patients and clients...
The extensive research on saccharin has been reviewed by many international scientists, including a wide range of British, Canadian, German, Swiss, Scandinavian and American researchers, and by...
About 90 scientific studies have thoroughly established the safety of acesulfame potassium (also known as acesulfame K), a non-caloric sweetener.
The Food and Drug Administration and almost all scientists who are familiar with the data conclude that aspartame, and its use in a wide variety of products, is a safe and useful option for those...
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Results from a research study of more than 1,000 adults, published in the...